PEOPLE’S CHOICE VOTE

Aquaculture Awards 2020 – The People’s Choice Award

Due to the postponement of Aquaculture UK this year the Aquaculture UK Awards Dinner, will unfortunately not take place as originally planned. However, at Aquaculture UK we all agree that it is vital that this important event does not go unmarked, so we are delighted to announce that this year’s winners will be celebrated as part of a unique Virtual Awards Ceremony across social media, on September 16th 2020.

In addition to the 12 award categories decided by our judging panel, there will be an opportunity for the aquaculture industry to recognise the most inspiring and innovative of all the nominees via People’s Choice award. Individual votes are welcomed for the entries submitted below. The winner will be announced on September 16th 2020.

VOTING IS NOW CLOSED.

Choosing your winner

You will find the biographies for each company and individual who made it onto a shortlist this year, below. Please take your time to choose who you feel has made the most significant impact to the Aquaculture industry in the past year. Cast your votes by entering your name and email address and choosing ONE nominee via the voting form.

Thank you! 

Biographies


Click on nominee to find out more.

Lovemore Ndovie, Kayalami Aquaculture
Funke Olatunde – a PhD student and fish farmer, Nigeria
Ross Fennel – site assistant with the Scottish Salmon Company, Gigha, Scotland
Noelia Rodriguez – hatchery manager for Scottish Sea Farms, Barcaldine, Scotland
Gordon Turnbull – owner and operator of Isle of Mull Oysters, Scotland
George Holmyard – manager of Offshore Shellfish, Devon, England
Koo Eng Wah – Sepang Today Aquaculture Centre, Malaysia
Amy Novogratz – co-founder and head of Aqua-Spark, Netherlands
Alan Henshaw – manager of Calverton Fish Farm, England
Alastair Barge – owner/operator of Otter Ferry Seafish, Scotland
Djames Lim – CEO of the Lim Shrimp Group, Indonesia
Inovafeed – insect protein producer, France
Fjord Maritime – Hybrid system for feed barges, Norway
Nofir – recycling, Norway
EWOS/Cargill Aqua Nutrition – developing compostable feed bags, Scotland
Benchmark Genetics/StofnFiskur
Ace Aquatec
NAFC Marine Centre UHI
Gael Force Group
Loch Duart – Salmon Pool community funding
Mowi Scotland – Salmon Wagon
The Scottish Salmon Company – Outer Hebrides Local Energy Hub (OHLEH), Lewis
Aquaseed Fishtecknik – fish smokers, Nigeria
The Scottish Salmon Company – Apprentice to Expert training scheme, Scotland
Scottish Sea Farms – Eday Employee Housing, Scotland
The Scottish Salmon Company – Outer Hebrides Local Energy Hub (OHLEH), Lewis, Scotland
John Avizienius and Malcolm Johnstone – RSPCA Assured
FAI Farms – Tilapia Wellbeing project
Benchmark Genetics – SalmoBreed Salten
Ace Aquatec and Scottish Sea Farms – novel slaughtering systems
Scottish Shellfish Marketing Group – novel packaging
Vita Aqua Feeds (World Feeds Ltd) – cleaner fish feed blocks
EWOS/Cargill Aqua Nutrition/Gaia BioMaterials Ltd – compostable feed bags
Funke Olatunde – Imoran Farms, Nigeria
Rosie Dreghorn – Cargill/EWOS, Scotland
Zoe Fletcher – AquaBio Tech Group, Malta
Ivana Russon – BioMar, Scotland
Professor Chalres Ngugi – Kenya
Dr Martin Jaffa – Callander McDowell, UK
Nigel Woodhouse – Hawkshead Trout, UK
Nick Bradbury – BioMar, UK
The Global Salmon Initiative (GSI)
Mowi Scotland – River Lochy salmon enhancement project
Davidsons Animal Feeds / The James Hutton Institute – seaweed in livestock feeds
Benchmark Genetics / Nofima – development of whitespot-resistant shrimp

 

Lovemore Ndovie, Kayalami Aquaculture

Lovemore Ndovie, a national of Malawina is a trained Aquaculture and Aquaponics Technician with Aquaculture Innovations(RSA). She is also part of the Tilapia Hatchery Management with David Fincham Aquaculture in Republic of South Africa. She has expertise in hatchery and growout management, aquaponics and system maintenance. Her experience has led her to being at the at the helm of Kayalami Aquaculture, the first Tilapia RAS production facility in Congo Democratic Republic in 2018. Her organisation skills have meant she has truimphed in Tilapia production in the DRC while producing higher volumes at lower costs. The facility is currently at 650,000 fingerlings hatchery and 10 tonne per annum at growout, which is expected to increase in the next year to 2,500,000 fingerlings per annum and 40 tonne at growout. Lovemore is currently working on a skills development facility at the farm which she will be leading while providing training to small scale farmers.

Funke Olatunde – a PhD student and fish farmer, Nigeria

Food security is a major issue in Africa, which inspired the launch of Funke Olatunde’s company Imoran Farms. Imoran Farms produce high-quality animal protein while adding value. Funke was featured in a Nigerian newspaper (Guardian) as a youth, on how she positively impacted agriculture in Africa. At a young age, Funke developed a huge passion for aquaculture. To pursue her dreams she did an Msc in aquaculture at the University of Stirling to enhance her academic knowledge, having already gained a Zoology degree. She has since expanded the fish production business at Imoran across a wide value chain, including fish seed supply, value addition, and consultancy. She delivers training that she tailors to individual needs.

Ross Fennel – site assistant with the Scottish Salmon Company, Gigha, Scotland

Ross has been a Senior Marine Operative on the Isle of Gigha, at The Scotish Salmon Company for the last two and a half years. He has been a driving force in implementing many of the positive changes across marine sites in the area. His vast knowledge extends to all areas of marine farming, as he provides invaluable support to the site manager and training of new staff members. Furthermore, Ross was the health and safety & HR representative for Gigha before handing over this role to a colleague at the end of 2019. During this time he provided The Scottish Salmon Company team with invaluable information and was a direct link to both departments. Ross leads various safety drills which proved vitally important as the team grew in size. When it comes to feeding fish Ross takes great interest, always trying to ensure healthy growth. He continually makes notes on feeding response and behaviours as well as analysing data from monthly sample weights. His attention to detail and record keeping are first class which is extremely important when it comes to auditing. Ross operates the site workboat carrying out harvests, grading and treatments as well as mooring work and regular site maintenance. In addition, Ross carries out most of the maintenance of work boats and polar boats to the highest standard.

Noelia Rodriguez – hatchery manager for Scottish Sea Farms, Barcaldine, Scotland

Originally from Asturias in northern Spain where she graduated from the University of Oviedo with a Biology Degree, Noelia gained an early insight into the sector as a Research Associate for NAFC Marine Centre in Shetland before joining Scottish Sea Farms in 2012 as Fish Health Biologist (Marine). It was during these years as a regular face out on marine farms (years in which Noelia also gained an MSc in Sustainable Aquaculture from the University of St Andrews) that she came to understand the importance of smolt quality. In 2017 Noelia was offered the role of Freshwater Fish Health & Welfare Manager and later that year Noelia was offered her biggest role to date: Operations Manager of Scottish Sea Farms’ all-new freshwater Barcaldine Hatchery, equipped with RAS (recirculating aquaculture system) technology. With construction works now complete and the hatchery preparing for its official opening ceremony in May 2020, she and her freshwater farm team are ready to fine-tune key factors..

Gordon Turnbull – owner and operator of Isle of Mull Oysters, Scotland

Gordon Turnbull works as Owner & Operator of ‘Isle of Mull Oysters’, Scotland. He has been working for some time with his father who established the company back in 1977. Gordon has been innovating within the business for many years in his mission to ‘produce the best oyster they can, to find solutions for any difficulties and constantly improve what we do.’ Gordon has an interesting background, both academically and in experiential terms to make a success of developing the farm further. Gordon has worked with French oyster company, YAD, to gain practical experience and is active in trialling innovative methods. His utilisation of in-water graders allows all stages of oysters to be graded, but more importantly, also reduces the stress on the animals considerably. More recently Gordon has joined the management committee of the ASSG and has shown himself to be an active participant within the Association.

George Holmyard – manager of Offshore Shellfish, Devon, England

Offshore Shellfish is a family run business, which has been involved in the mussel and seafood industries for more than 25 years. Offshore Shellfish are building the UK’s first large-scale fully offshore, rope cultured mussel farm off the coast of South Devon. George Holmyard is the Head of Operations of Offshore Shellfish Ltd. (OSL) who returned from Scotland to his native Southwest England to work on the business in Devon. He grew up in the mussel farming industry, and has worked on many farms in the UK and New Zealand. This has given him a good breadth and depth of knowledge of the industry.

Koo Eng Wah – Sepang Today Aquaculture Centre, Malaysia

Khoo Eng Wah, (Malaysian Chinese) and graduated in Biology from Nanyang University Singapore, and post graduate diploma in Fisheries Science. For the past 45 years Khoo has been involved in crustacea farming and hatchery seed production (Production of Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Penaeus monodon, Litopenaues vannamei, Scylla crab, Portunus Crab and Australia fresh water crayfish or Cherax quadricarinatus.) Since 1997 Khoo has used the farming and hatchery facilities as a training ground for conducting aquaculture technical training for new investors or aquafarmers. The setups provide hands-on practical work for the investors. Khoo was appointed as the Technical Adviser for two Malaysian universities as well as appointed as a panelist of the Spiny Lobster farming and breeding textbook curriculum for the Malaysian government.

Amy Novogratz – co-founder and head of Aqua-Spark, Netherlands

Launched in 2011, Aqua-Spark is a global investment fund with a mission to transform the global aquaculture industry into one that is healthier, more sustainable, and more accessible. They invest in aquaculture companies across the value chain’s panning farming operations, alternative feed ingredients, disease-battling technology, and consumer-facing aquaculture products. These companies are solving some of the industry’s big challenges while bringing returns that are comparable to today’s traditional industry. The portfolio works as an ecosystem, with the companies agreeing to collaborate on optimal solutions, and working together toward this shared vision of a more efficient global aquaculture industry. Since 2015, the fund has invested in 18 complementary SMEs. Thus far, Aqua-Spark has EUR 111.7 million in assets under management, dedicated to investments in elements of the aquaculture industry that will make fish farming sustainable. The goal of the fund is to ultimately make sustainability widespread and profitable enough that it becomes the only way to farm fish. Amy Novogratz is leading the charge for sustainable aquaculture with a commitment to getting aquaculture right at a moment when our exploding population requires smarter, more efficient methods for growing nutrient-rich food. Amy brings almost two decades of experience in fostering collaborative solutions to some of the world’s big challenges.

Alan Henshaw – manager of Calverton Fish Farm, England

One and a half million fish of seven different species, varying in size from fertilised egg to four inch 3 year old’s, are reared under the careful watch of Alan Henshaw, Ian Rockley and the staff of the Environmental Agency’s Calverton Fish Farm, which in recent years has become the most prominent of its type in England. The leader in fish farming, conservation and research in the country, restocking rivers, lakes, reservoirs and canals nationwide. Alan Henshaw, the Manager of Calverton Fish Farm in England is one of the top five 5 European hatchery specialists in riverine and lacustrine indigenous species. Alan has been mentoring and training hundreds of young people over the last 20 years via the the water authorities Severn Trent, NRA and EA. His specialist area is in restocking native species such as chub, barbell, bream and roach.

Alastair Barge – owner/operator of Otter Ferry Seafish, Scotland

With more than 40 years-experience in farming fish, Alastair Barge is undoubtedly a father figure in the Scottish Aquaculture. Having reprised his own fathers responsibilities as managing director of Otter Ferry Seafish, Alastair successfully developed the business, driven by its sense of innovation. Alastair is truly passionate about fish farming. Beginning with rainbow trout farming and then pioneering land-based Atlantic salmon production, Otter Ferry has over 50 years of aquaculture history including lobster, seaweed, turbot, the nationally famous Gigha halibut, and more recently ballan wrasse and lumpfish. His knowledge and expertise in both fish farming and business management turned Otter Ferry Seafish into UK’s largest farmed ballan wrasse producers (2019) and one of its leaders in lumpfish farming. This made of Otter Ferry a leading company in the supply of sustainably produce cleaner fish used in the fight against sea lice, thus contributing to an eco-friendlier aquaculture.

Djames Lim – CEO of the Lim Shrimp Group, Indonesia

One of South East Asia’s largest shrimp farming groups is the Lim Shrimp Organization (LSO) headed by CEO Djames Lim, which has established a network of integrated farming projects known as Aqua Villages. In 2018, it completed 12 such projects in Indonesia, two in Thailand and one in Malaysia. All used sustainable farming principles including the use of probiotics and biofloc systems. CEO, Djames Lim, explains that the organization’s motto is to turn countrymen and fishers who are living in poverty into aquapreneurs by teaching them how to culture economically viable shrimp, fish and any other species, thereby raising real prospects that they will one day own their own farm and land. The organisation strongly believes in environmental protection and using sustainable methods to grow shrimp. “We embrace a wholesome approach involving social, environmental and economic components”, DJames Lim says. Lim explains how using probiotics and biofloc principles is important to the success of the company. In 2018, the company completed 12 LSO Aqua Village projects in Indonesia, two in Thailand and another in Malaysia. For 2019, the organisation secured contracts for another 50 projects across Asia, revealing the amount of interest there is in sustainable shrimp farming using natural principles, and its huge potential. In 2019 the company also constructed the largest sea cucumber farm in the world, using closed cycle farming techniques and advanced indoor RAS technology in China.

Innovafeed – insect protein producer, France

InnovaFeed have a clear goal: To support the sustainable growth of an important industry, which supplies vital nutrition to millions, whilst also safeguarding marine resources for future generations. Aquafeeds remain one of the highest costs to the industry both in monetary value, but also carbon footprint. The necessity for continued, reliable, high quality protein sources that drive the nutrition of aquaculture systems presents a considerable challenge. The traditional sources of fishmeal cannot continue to sustainably meet the high demand and rapid growth rates, whilst the newer vegetable sources come with their own challenges, environmental and nutritional. Thanks to their ability to convert low-value biomass into high quality animal proteins and reintroduce them in the food chain, insects are emerging as an excellent natural and sustainable solution to address this challenge. In the past three years, InnovaFeed has confirmed the potential of Hermetia illucens, also known as the Black Soldier Fly, to produce high-quality protein for aquafeed, thereby contributing to the rise of a sustainable aquaculture and to the preservation of oceanic resources. Often, alternative or novel ingredients show great potential at a small scale but true industrialization somehow never seems to be realised. InnovaFeed stands out again, by opening their full scale (10,000mT Insect protein) factory in April 2020. This follows the very successful, smaller (1000mT), pilot site opened in 2018. The wide-spread usage of insect meals will have a considerable impact on the industry in the next 5 years and InnovaFeed is leading the movement.

Fjord Maritime – Hybrid system for feed barges, Norway

As the aquaculture industry grows, it becomes increasingly difficult to power fish farms in a sustainable manner. Diesel generators create local sea and air pollution as well as greenhouse gas emissions. On top of these negative environmental impacts, fuel costs are on the rise and comprise a substantial part of expenses for aquaculture operators. Fjord Hybrid reduces fuel consumption in fish farms by up to 60 per cent. Their solution automates power supply and optimises the use of generators, batteries, electrical drives and control systems. How have they done this? To better manage power supplies for fish farms, Fjord Maritime has created the Fjord Hybrid® solution. Fjord Hybrid automates power generation and supply for an individual fish farm, optimising all aspects of operation and reducing generator running time by up to 90 per cent. By cutting running time for generators, Fjord Hybrid also reduces service and maintenance costs, as well as eliminates noise for workers on the barge and any neighbours. Fjord Hybrid is a plug-and-play system delivered in a container, which can be placed at any suitable location on board a barge – and easily moved from one fish farm to another. The system can also be directly installed inside a vessel, without the need for a container. The Fjord Hybrid solution is operated remotely through Fjord Maritime’s Fjord Control system. The solution continually transmits information about status and any unexpected events, meaning any necessary corrections can be performed remotely and in real time, thereby securing maximal uptime.

Nofir – recycling, Norway

Nofir AS is one of the leading companies collecting discarded equipment from fishing and fish farming around the world. The Norwegian company has built an international, circular-economy network that creates value while combating a long-standing threat to marine life and the environment. The system provides a clear channel for disposal of materials used in ropes and nets that have previously been landfilled, incinerated or discarded at sea. Collected nets are transported to Nofir’s factories where they are prepared for recycling. The system generates annually 7,000 metric tons of raw material for the recycling industry. Since 2011 more than 41,346 tons of discarded equipment have been collected from 5 continents (including Antarctica). With Nofir’s help, recycling centers can turn aquaculture waste into ECONYL® yarn, which can be used in clothing, textiles, carpets. The biggest brands like PRADA, Burberry, Adidas, Gucci are using ECONYL® in their collections. From 1 ton of discarded fishing nets, Aquafil can make 26,000 pairs of socks. Collecting fishing and fish farming equipment helps not only to save raw materials necessary to create new products but also has a positive impact on the environment. Studies show that 640,000 ton of fishing equipment is dumped or lost at sea each year and 27% of all marine debris is plastic coming from fishing gear. Nofir has three main goals: preventing equipment from the fishing and fish farming industry from ending up at sea or landfill, reduction in oil, reduction in CO2 emission.

EWOS/Cargill Aqua Nutrition – developing compostable feed bags, Scotland

Cargill Aqua Nutrition recognised their responsibility to go beyond the expected in order to achieve a higher standard of sustainability and began to investigate the feasibility of using compostable bags to package their products. As well as being environmentally friendly, it was equally important to ensure that this packaging was as practical as the current packaging. Plastic provides a great, durable packaging material – so to replace this is a challenge. Cargill Aqua Nutrition Scotland teamed up with Gaia BioMaterials UK whose vision to “replace current fossil-based plastics with a renewable and compostable alternative without sacrificing quality” aligned with what Cargill were looking to achieve. Gaia BioMaterials’ Biodolomer® is a fully biodegradable biomaterial that is part of the EU’s LIFE program. Their products have been tested and have shown to be fully compostable in 4 weeks. The material is also GMO free, food grade, fully compostable and will never leave nano or micro plastics behind – there is no plastic material in it. In addition, a life cycle analysis commissioned by the EU (Life) showed a life cycle saving of carbon dioxide of 6.6 tonnes for every tonne of fossil plastic replaced. It also shows a very positive result when compared to biobased plastics (PET). The next stage of the process is to begin full production using the 25kg bags while working towards creating a suitable compostable tote bag with the vision that in the near future all Cargill Aqua Nutrition’s customers in Scotland will receive their feed in compostable bags.

Benchmark Genetics/StofnFiskur

Stofnfiskur is one of the world’s leading companies in selective breeding and production of Atlantic salmon ova. The concept of Stofnfiskur is based around producing salmon eggs all year round with the highest biosecurity available. The Atlantic salmon eggs, fry, parr and smolt are produced by world class specialists in genetics, in a disease-free environment not found anywhere else in the salmon farming industry. The customer’s needs are of top priority at StofnFiskur. Delivering eggs all year round enables customers to secure a yearly improvement of production cost by improving growth rate and increasing survival, which makes for a more profitable salmon business. Stofnfiskur today exports to 22 countries. This market has slowly built up through the years mainly due to the high biosecure level of the salmon broodstock in Iceland.

In 2009-2011 Stofnfiskur helped the Chilean industry to recover after the Infectious Salmon Anemia (ISA) crisis by supplying eggs from Iceland. Since June 2019 there has been an export ban on all salmon eggs from Norway to Scotland and due to the excellent production capacity at Stofnfiskur, Benchmark Genetics has been able to supply the Scottish market with all their egg needs to date.

Ace Aquatec

Ace Aquatec develops its products from the ground up. A core problem typically initiates the development path. A partnership of leading technology providers ensures the best solution. Their goal is always the improved economic performance and sustainability of the aquaculture industry. Some of their fields of specialism include: fish harvesting, sealice removal, deterrent solutions, and biomass and lice detection. Fish Harvesting – In 2016 Ace created a humane electrical stunner for all species of fish, regardless of size. An InnovateUK grant and a BBSRC grant helped validate humane credentials and savings (halving staff, doubling throughout speed). This system has brought sustainable farming practices to over 20 countries worldwide, and is being expanded into Asian markets on an H.S.A. Award (£720k). Sealice removal – In 2018 (EMFF grant) Ace developed a unique modular sealice removal system for SSF. The goal was to reduce fish stress during the lice removal process and to achieve repeatable removal (over 90%). Their solution was a containerised pipeline capable of applying electric fields, waterjets, bubbles, and warm showers. Filtering of the water throughout the process reduced the risk of reinfection. This system is commercially available and is priced well below competitors alternatives. Deterrent solutions- IOT devices, low frequency noise in the safe hearing range for porpoises, sonar activation triggers for reduced duty cycle, and electric field systems that train seals to avoid farms their goal has been to responsibly avoid predation on fish farms while reducing our impact on non-target wildlife. 

 

NAFC Marine Centre UHI

The NAFC Marine Centre is an educational and scientific institute, located in Scalloway in Shetland. The Centre provides a range of services relevant to the maritime industries, including: training and education; research and development; and consultancy and advisory services. The Centre is operated by a charitable trust (the Shetland Fisheries Training Centre Trust) and employs about 40 people. The NAFC provides essential and innovative training required by aquaculture sector. With its finger on the pulse of the industry the NAFC can adapt and develop required training courses rapidly in order to allow business to stay compliant and better educate their staff. This is proven by our online courses in Fish Welfare, Containment, Fish Vaccines and R.A.S. Water Quality Awareness. In 2019 the new Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in Aquaculture Management launched with enrolment figures exceeding expectation and reaching a truly global audience. This course joins the NAFC’s growing range of online flexible learning allowing companies further opportunity to develop their employees. Through their online learning NAFC now reach from Mexico to Russia for enrolments.

Gael Force Group

Almost 40 years ago, as the production of farmed Atlantic Salmon began its ascent in Scotland, Gael Force was founded with an aim to bring better catching, higher quality, and more robust fishing equipment to fishermen in the Hebrides. The drive to partner with the local fishing community to develop and manufacture equipment suited to individual needs, enabled our founder Stewart Graham and his customers to build lasting, trusted relationships. Stewart’s dedication to putting his customer’s needs front and centre of everything he did all those years ago still guides our approach to supporting the aquaculture sector to this very day. Quaculture is at the heart of what Gael Force do. From their first involvement in the specification and supply of mooring grids, they have grown to become a globally recognised key supply partner with the capability to offer highly durable turnkey solutions for fish farm site installations, driving enhancements in our product range and service capabilities through a focus on delivering higher levels of innovation. Over the course of the past two years, Gael Force have taken considerable steps forward in cementing their position as a trusted, value-adding supply partner. On top of this they are are passionate about playing their part in promoting aquaculture, partaking in DYW events and school visits to advocate the benefits of salmon farming. And through the success of aquaculture, are pleased to be able to contribute and support towards community projects commemorating the Iolaire disaster in the Hebrides by leading a project to build a visitor centre in Stornoway. 

Loch Duart – Salmon Pool community funding

In 2019 Loch Duart celebrated 20 years of farming their world-renowned salmon in North West Scotland. The Sutherland part of the farm has been operating as part of the Scourie, Kinlochbervie and Lochinver community since 1975, (originally as J Johnston & Sons Ltd) and since 2006 they have been part of the Uist community. The choice for the location of Loch Duart’s first farm was no accident. It’s the perfect environment in which to rear farmed salmon in a way that mimics wild salmon as closely as possible. The cooperation and support of the local community was crucial to their success and they take great pride in being an independent, Scottish company bringing jobs and investment into some of the most isolated parts of Scotland. Over the years the community has benefitted from the business expanding and employing and training local people. Businesses including the hospitality and tourist industries have benefited from more staff living and spending in the Hebrides and Sutherland. Salmon Pool Their success is down to the support and close involvement of their wonderful local communities, so they launched Salmon Pool a partnership with our fish feed supplier, Cargill Aqua Nutrition. A carefully curated and targeted fund, it’s available to charities and projects providing support to the local community.

Mowi Scotland – Salmon Wagon

The Outer Hebrides Local Energy Hub (OHLEH) project is a powerful example of a local circular economy initiative that creates value, develops social opportunities and reduces environmental impacts. Funded by the Scottish Government’s Local Energy Challenge Fund, it was brought together to encourage collaborative solutions to waste management and energy challenges. The four partners are: – The Scottish Salmon Company (SSC): leading producer of quality Scottish salmon – Comhairle nan Eilean Siar (CnES): local authority and lead project partner – Pure Energy Centre (PEC): award-winning manufacturer of hydrogen and oxygen systems – Community Energy Scotland (CES): charity which helps communities to own, control and benefit from their local renewable energy resources SSC are focused on the responsible and sustainable development of rural Scotland. They have been investigating innovative ways to dispose of fish waste material locally. The OHLEH project involves the transfer of fish waste which is integrated with household and garden waste and broken down in the CnES anaerobic digester (AD). The AD produces biogas, which fuels a combined heat and power plant to generate electricity. An electrolyser powered by this electricity produces green hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen will be used in a fuel cell that powers lighting at one of our nearby hatcheries. The green oxygen will be used to aerate the tanks at the hatchery – bringing the energy from fish waste full circle. This is the first time a fully green, zero-emission energy source like hydrogen has been used in an aquaculture context anywhere in the world. 

Aquaseed Fishtecknik – fish smokers, Nigeria

Creators of the Fishtecklin 2 Oven to give sustainable access to fish smoking services necessary for sustainability and improved financial performance of fish farmers for additional income in developing countries. It’s also built to enhance efficiency and welfare at fish smoking jobs thereby creating a huge profit-making venture for prospective fish value chain entrepreneurs and stimulating entrepreneurial activities among youths interested in smoked fish export business. A major challenge to the fish farming business in most African (developing) countries is post harvest losses, due to poor means of preservation. The main preservation method of traditional ovens made of mud-baked or half-cut chemical drums would no longer satisfy consumers demand, as consumers are becoming more aware of their foods, the quality and the safety. The efficiency of fish smoking and the quality of the final product becomes paramount. The FISHTECKLIN 2 OVEN is a deviation from the traditional oven, a mechanical oven for commercial fish smoking. It comprises of external heat source from gas and charcoal derivative (saw-dust briquette),a heat chamber cabinet, an array of trays, racks, thermometer, fans and gadgets for controlling heat velocity, circulation and interaction between smoke and fish components. It’s built of stainless steel, easy to clean with high sanitation standard and hygenic standard. Sizes ranges from 100kg wet weight capacity to 5tons of fish at a go. The body is insulated to conserve heat and prevent heat loss to the surroundings.The fan operates on solar Pv cells, making it very economical and adaptive to remote communities without electricity.

The Scottish Salmon Company – Apprentice to Expert training scheme, Scotland

The Scottish Salmon Company launched their Community Charter in 2017 to communicate their commitment to being a good neighbour. The charter is underpinned by a Responsibility Framework, which was developed in line with Business in the Community guidance and aligned to UN Sustainable Development Goals. It brings to life their core values: Pride in our Scottish salmon, Passion of People and Provenance and the Environment and details how these should be reflected in their behaviour. Some of their focuses include: – a focus on providing quality employment and investing and developing staff. – providing a safe working environment. – offering young people, skilled long-term employment and career opportunities. – promoting the Scottish aquaculture sector demonstrating the diverse career opportunities available. – conducting business in a responsible, honest and ethical manner. – ensuring appropriate standards across quality, ethical and environmental care. – being a responsible neighbour and an active and integral part of communities. – bringing people and communities together by encouraging staff to champion local causes. – sourcing locally wherever possible and building partnerships with local suppliers. – being custodians of the natural environment, operating in an environmentally respectful way. – adopting exacting standards of animal welfare and environmental practices.

Scottish Sea Farms – Eday Employee Housing, Scotland

As remote locations go, they don’t come much more far-flung than Eday; one of the smaller Orkney islands with just 76 habitable properties for a population of 129 people. It’s this very remoteness, combined with the lack of available inhabitable homes, that threatened the long-term viability of our salmon farm; a farm that in eight short years has grown over 1.6 million premium salmon with a combined market value in excess of £44 million. Explains Phil: “Unless employees lived on one of the nearby islands, they had to stay over until their next weekend off. Given the lack of accommodation, ‘staying over’ could mean another boat trip to a nearby island, leaving little time around work for everyday tasks such as food shopping or laundry. The result was that we were seeing valued employees leave with each crop cycle – they loved the job, just not the logistics that went with it.” To find a solution Phil proposed a radical change in company practices: • Step one – introduce a two-week on, two-week off shift pattern (the first of our farms to do so) for better work/ life balance • Step two – build high-specification houses that staff could go home to after each shift, removing the interisland commute and freeing up more personal time. Phil approached local landowners, Willowstream, about the possibility of building the homes within the secluded area of Mill Bay. Very quickly, a like-minded partnership formed and a development concept was agreed for ‘Millhaefen’, a 1.5 acre, six-strong development of homes.

The Scottish Salmon Company – Outer Hebrides Local Energy Hub (OHLEH), Lewis, Scotland

The Outer Hebrides Local Energy Hub (OHLEH) project is a powerful example of a local circular economy initiative that creates value, develops social opportunities and reduces environmental impacts. Funded by the Scottish Government’s Local Energy Challenge Fund, it was brought together to encourage collaborative solutions to waste management and energy challenges. The four partners are: – The Scottish Salmon Company (SSC): leading producer of quality Scottish salmon – Comhairle nan Eilean Siar (CnES): local authority and lead project partner – Pure Energy Centre (PEC): award-winning manufacturer of hydrogen and oxygen systems – Community Energy Scotland (CES): charity which helps communities to own, control and benefit from their local renewable energy resources SSC are focused on the responsible and sustainable development of rural Scotland. They have been investigating innovative ways to dispose of fish waste material locally. The OHLEH project involves the transfer of fish waste which is integrated with household and garden waste and broken down in the CnES anaerobic digester (AD). The AD produces biogas, which fuels a combined heat and power plant to generate electricity. An electrolyser powered by this electricity produces green hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen will be used in a fuel cell that powers lighting at one of our nearby hatcheries. The green oxygen will be used to aerate the tanks at the hatchery – bringing the energy from fish waste full circle. This is the first time a fully green, zero-emission energy source like hydrogen has been used in an aquaculture context anywhere in the world.

John Avizienius and Malcolm Johnstone – RSPCA Assured

In the late 1990s, the RSPCA was approached by a Scottish fish farming company and invited to produce a set of welfare standards for farmed Atlantic salmon, in the same way that they had produced welfare standards for a number of terrestrial species. With the help of colleagues from the salmon industry, it took three years to develop these standards, and they were launched in 2002. The standards were initially implemented through the Freedom Food Farm Assurance Scheme, which has latterly been renamed RSPCA Assured. Throughout this time, the scheme has enjoyed a fluctuating majority of the industry being certified to its standards, and has personnel visiting fish farming establishments and communicating with the industry on a daily basis. It is largely through these experiences that our comments are based upon. One of the keys to being able to develop the welfare standards has been the willingness of a young industry to participate in a process of continuous improvement. As a result of this, they have seen tangible improvements in many areas of salmon husbandry such as larval rearing, fish handling, fish transport and fish slaughter. The RSPCA standards also pioneered the concept of health planning and also introduced the first guidelines for cleaner fish in 2010. Two notable members of the team which have had a long association with the scheme and the industry are John Avizienius and Malcolm Johnstone. Over the years, their work must have had a positive impact on literally hundreds of millions of farmed Atlantic Salmon and Rainbow Trout. 

FAI Farms – Tilapia Wellbeing project

The research group aims to understand the welfare critical points (WCP) for the tilapia involved in the aquaculture chain. Handling, grading, capture, transport and slaughter usually involve animals being subjected to stress, pain and fear. Even though tilapia is the most popular species of fish produced in Brazil, scientific information regarding tilapia welfare indicators adequate for field conditions and adapted to routine use among fish farmers and slaughterhouses is lacking. Ongoing research aims to (1) establish a tilapia welfare assessment protocol including the stages of growing, reproduction, capture and slaughter, that can be used on a daily basis; (2) deliver manuals of best handling practices for CWP mitigation, and 3) develop strategies and devices to improve welfare, starting with a portable stun and kill equipment. This innovative work will provide technical support to assess tilapia welfare and strategies for welfare improvement along Brazilian aquaculture. All the acquired knowledge will be transformed into technical didactic material that may be used on field by technicians, with the possibility to adaptation its use in other important tilapia producing regions such as Africa and Asia. 

Benchmark Genetics – SalmoBreed Salten

SalmoBreed Salten is the most advanced land-based facility for the production of salmon ova in the world, located in Sørfjorden in Northern Norway. It provides high-quality genetic material to the global salmon market, which is recognized for rapid growth, late sexual maturity, resistance to disease and parasites, and outstanding flesh quality. Substantial investments in R&D have resulted in products with improved resistance to major disease challenges.

SalmoBreed Salten is designed to hold the entire life cycle of broodstock on land, from egg to final mature broodstock. The result is the highest standards of biosecurity in the industry, which does not only provide high-quality ova to customers but also greatly benefits the welfare of the fish. By providing the best genetics available at the start of the production cycle, this ensures robust, fast-growing salmon with a higher resistance towards disease and parasites.

The breeding program at Salten is broad and sustainable, focusing on resistance to disease and parasites, growth, late maturation, and fillet color. It adheres to the 3Rs: Replacement, reduction, and refinement, which provides a framework for performing more humane animal research, meaning that the number of fish tested on is limited. SalmoBreed Salten aims to provide the most outstanding genetics available at the start of the production cycle, helping aquaculture producers increase quality, yield and most importantly, the health and welfare of their animals.

Ace Aquatec and Scottish Sea Farms – novel slaughtering systems

Ace Aquatec and Scottish Sea Farms have a shared belief in the importance of using technology to accelerate the adoption of responsible farming practices across the industry. This shared passion led them to partnering on the development of several innovative slaughter technologies for Scottish Sea Farms own factories, and also to openly inviting other farms to learn from these welfare breakthroughs. In 2014 Ace Aquatec and Scottish Sea Farms began looking at how electric stunning technology could be introduced at its South Shian factory to drive improvements in this area. After success developing and deploying an innovative in-water electric stunner, the two companies continued working together to further develop the slaughter process and also share these new welfare best practices across the wider industry. In addition to improving their main slaughter lines, Scottish Sea Farms has recently worked with Ace Aquatec to introduce in-water electric stunning lines for its by-catch. These by-catch fish (saithe) enter the fish pens while small and grow to salmon harvest weight but cannot enter the human food chain. To support Scottish Sea Farms in providing a more humane killing method than anaesthesia – the industry standard approach – Ace Aquatec developed electric stunners for their two harvest factories that humanely and instantly kills these fish. 

Scottish Shellfish Marketing Group – novel packaging

Development of the ‘Fresh Pack’: an alternative to the use of EPS in the transportation of live mussels. In 2016 the transportation of our live mussels changed to polystyrene (EPS) boxes with ice. This decision was taken after extensive trials which showed that the inclusion of ice increased the quality of this live product. This was especially evident during the warmer summer months and was essential in maintaining year-round availability to customers. As a result of this, customer complaints regarding live mussels fell by over 70% from 2015 to 2017. Polystyrene boxes have key attributes required for transportation of live mussels. They are waterproof, lightweight and have excellent insulating properties. SSMG has recognised the importance of reducing the level of single-use plastics in our supply chain wherever possible and identified the use of polystyrene boxes as a prime target for achieving this. In collaboration with our packaging supplier Cepac, SSMG have been at the forefront of innovation, driving an alternative to the use of EPS. We have invested significant time and resources with Cepac working in collaboration over a period of over 18 months. Following on from 5 design trials they were proud to produce a corrugate cardboard equivalent to polystyrene. Their main challenge in finding an alternative to polystyrene was to not lose the benefits gained from its use. Fundamentally, they did not want to create a solution which would result in increased levels of food-waste. 

Vita Aqua Feeds (World Feeds Ltd) – cleaner fish feed blocks

World Feeds Ltd has been producing unique, complete and balanced diets for captive fish around the world since our inception in 2004. They specialise in aquatic nutrition and feed hundreds of thousands of marine and freshwater animals in some of the largest public aquariums in the world, including the 45 Million Litre marine exhibit of SEA Sentosa in Singapore. World Feeds Ltd operate on the simple premise of improving the way fish are fed. Our success has always been driven by this core ethos, bolstered by a combination of high quality feeds, unique processing techniques and innovative methods of presentation. 2019 marked the commercial launch of their long-in-development aquaculture line Vita Aqua Feeds (VAF), bringing years of perfecting tailored fish feeds into global aquaculture with unique feed block diets targeted at cleaner fish, such as lumpfish and wrasse, and the control of sea lice. The VAF range is a distinctive combination of tailored nutrition and innovatively engineered feeding stations, all of their own design, which can be employed in sea pens, flow through and recirculation systems. Their objective is to revolutionise the way that cleaner fish are fed and maintained, benefitting not only them, but operation personnel and ultimately the salmon livestock. Extensive research and trials with Loch Duart and GIFAS over the past few years has helped them to develop and fine-tune their products into what is now commercially available and has been extremely well-received by numerous aquaculture operations in the Northern hemisphere. 

EWOS/Cargill Aqua Nutrition/Gaia BioMaterials Ltd – compostable feed bags

Cargill Aqua Nutrition recognised their responsibility to go beyond the expected in order to achieve a higher standard of sustainability and began to investigate the feasibility of using compostable bags to package their products. As well as being environmentally friendly, it was equally important to ensure that this packaging was as practical as the current packaging. Plastic provides a great, durable packaging material – so to replace this is a challenge. Cargill Aqua Nutrition Scotland teamed up with Gaia BioMaterials UK whose vision to “replace current fossil-based plastics with a renewable and compostable alternative without sacrificing quality” aligned with what Cargill were looking to achieve. Gaia BioMaterials’ Biodolomer® is a fully biodegradable biomaterial that is part of the EU’s LIFE program. Their products have been tested and have shown to be fully compostable in 4 weeks. The material is also GMO free, food grade, fully compostable and will never leave nano or micro plastics behind – there is no plastic material in it. In addition, a life cycle analysis commissioned by the EU (Life) showed a life cycle saving of carbon dioxide of 6.6 tonnes for every tonne of fossil plastic replaced. It also shows a very positive result when compared to biobased plastics (PET). The next stage of the process is to begin full production using the 25kg bags while working towards creating a suitable compostable tote bag with the vision that in the near future all Cargill Aqua Nutrition’s customers in Scotland will receive their feed in compostable bags. 

Funke Olatunde – Imoran Farms, Nigeria

Food security is a major issue in Africa, which inspired the launch of Funke Olatunde’s company Imoran Farms. Imoran Farms produce high-quality animal protein while adding value. Funke was featured in a Nigerian newspaper (Guardian) as a youth, on how she positively impacted agriculture in Africa. At a young age, Funke developed a huge passion for aquaculture. To pursue her dreams she did an Msc in aquaculture at the University of Stirling to enhance her academic knowledge, having already gained a Zoology degree. She has since expanded the fish production business at Imoran across a wide value chain, including fish seed supply, value addition, and consultancy. She delivers training that she tailors to individual needs. 

Rosie Dreghorn – Cargill/EWOS, Scotland

Rosie joined Cargill in May 2019 directly from Skretting and became a valuable addition to the Cargill family. Rosie joined Cargill to work with customers whilst supporting the formulations team in the North Sea. She quickly demonstrated her skills and capabilities in the team resulting in rapidly expanding responsibilities. Rosie has been identified by Cargill as part of their high performers talent development program and is currently serving a 12 month secondment into our feed ingredient purchasing team to broaden her skills and experience further. On paper Rosie displays all of the potential needed to be one of the next leaders in Scottish Aquaculture. Her feet are metaphorically firmly planted in the sea, with a degree in Marine Biology and a Masters in Aquaculture. Add in her practical experience as both a laboratory assistant and hatchery technician with MOWI and Rosie has the foundations of a rising star. However, what really sets Rosie apart is her incisive practical intelligence, calmness under pressure and her disarming sense of humour. She is a problem solver, a natural innovator and shows the potential to be a strong leader. 

Zoe Fletcher – AquaBio Tech Group, Malta

Purveyor of music, lover of paperback books and Aquaculture Consultant at AquaBioTech Group. Zoe Jay Fletcher is passionate about sustainable growth and innovation in global aquaculture sectors. They completed their BSc in Marine Biology in 2016, during their time as an undergraduate they also discovered their aptitude for people and business management whilst working their way up through the ranks in a Café. Zoe enriched their experience by undertaking an MSc in Aquaculture Business Management, which they graduated in 2017. They went on to secure a position as a Graduate Trainee at the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and are experienced in academic and professional research, aquaculture policy development, and environmental legislation and regulation. In August 2019, Zoe joined AquaBioTech Group where they have channelled their passion into real-world disruptive solutions, supporting blue growth across the EU and developing new projects for aquaculture research, development and innovation. In January 2020 they became task leader for aquaculture related aspects of the Horizon 2020 MUSICA project, working to deliver clean energy, and food and water security to small islands in the EU through multiple use of offshore space. In their free time, Zoe finds joy in the great outdoors, particularly at sea. Back on dry land, they continue to contribute to their work as a STEM ambassador with STEM Learning, inspiring and empowering other young women into careers in science and aquaculture. They also engage in voluntary work for environmental and social causes in Malta and beyond.

Ivana Russo – BioMar, Scotland

Since joining BioMar in 2017 as part of the SAIC graduate programme, Ivana has made measurable contributions and improvements to each of the business areas that she has spent time working in, and through close cooperation with customers, has developed new processes/tools, and reports to meet their requirements. Ivana has shown a natural talent and ambition for dealing with any task or project that we have given her, these are always embraced enthusiastically, and undertaken in an organised, diligent, and determined manner. Her inquisitive nature, resourcefulness and adaptability, combined with her great people skills, have meant that Ivana has been able to consistently deliver. For the first 18 months of her career in BioMar, Ivana worked in the Customer Support Team where despite her initial lack of knowledge of aquaculture she quickly learned to perform a range of tasks out on customer sites. Always keen for a new challenge and to learn, Ivana was given several specific projects to run. Two notably achievements during this time were; – The creation of a health and welfare assessment scoring matrix for cleaner fish. – The design and management of a successful commercial health and performance trial with a Lumpfish hatchery which resulted in the launch of a new BioMar product. In early 2019, Ivana became a Business Support Advisor, and learned how to apply the Lean method and problem-solving techniques. During this time Ivana supported our business efficiency programme by evaluating current processes and procedures to identify and eliminate waste, increase efficiency, and provide systems-based and data-driven solutions. 

Professor Chalres Ngugi – Kenya

Professor Ngugi has been at the forefront of Kenyan and wider Sub-Saharan aquaculture development for the last 25 years in a number of varied roles. He set up and ran a fish farm and hatchery training facility at Moi University whilst developing bespoke aquaculture curricula and courses there for many young kenyans to study over the subsequent years. He became the private undersecretary to the Fisheries Minister and then moved to Kenyatta and Karatina Universities, where he continued to teach and mentor many young Kenyans. He set up his own fish farm and integrated a hands on training centre at Mwea Fish farm, where he carries out a number of trials for the EU and US funded research projects. He works in hand with Stirling (UK) and Auburn and Oregon State Universities (US) through a range of international donors and investors. The results of all his hard work, patience, intelligence as well as his unselfish nature can be seen in his students; who are now working on and managing farms across Kenya and beyond. All of this steadily helps Kenya to be one of next big aquaculture producers across the African continent. 

Dr Martin Jaffa – Callander McDowell, UK

Dr Martin Jaffa has been defending and promoting the Scottish salmon farming industry for more than 40 years, for the past two decades in his weekly blog, ReLAKSation, and more recently in monthly columns for Fish Farmer. He also frequently appears in the letter pages of numerous newspapers and magazines. He has gone to great lengths to investigate the decline of wild salmon and trout stocks on the west coast and prove that salmon farmers are not the bogeymen portrayed by the angling lobby. Author, commentator, marketing expert, sounding board, and all round fish farming fanatic, his research is motivated by his passion for the industry and is mostly self-funded and undertaken independently. He remains unsung because he is a lone operator and is sometimes seen as a maverick who courts controversy. But he is never afraid to take on the sectors (or his own) detractors and pursues the industry’s loudest critics tirelessly. He is a necessary thorn in the side of government agencies, a one-man mission to hold them to account, always in the interests of the industry. In voicing concerns and raising awkward issues, often before anyone else does but usually after listening to the views of a widespread network of insiders, he has become an unofficial mouthpiece for the salmon sector. He is outspoken, opinionated and relentless, but as many would agree, salmon farming’s best friend. 

Nigel Woodhouse – Hawkshead Trout, UK

Nigel started trout farming 40 years ago after travelling in central and South America and living with indigenous natives. While sitting on BTA Council he championed environmental and welfare issues, long before they were today’s norm. This included humane slaughter, reed beds and settling ponds. He was approached by the Soil Association in 1995 to negotiate an organic standard for aquaculture and became the first UK Organic certified producer. He is now chair of Soil Association Organic Standards for Aquaculture, Chair of Organic Producers Association, contributes to UNESCO fish standards and to EU. He has recently been made a Fellow of the Royal Society for the detailed Journals he kept during his time in South America. 

Nick Bradbury – BioMar, UK

Nick Bradbury dedicated his 25-year career to Scottish aquaculture. After completing an MSC in Aquaculture at Stirling University, he became very much a ‘hands on’ salmon farmer on the west coast of Scotland before moving into fish feed with Fulmar in 1992. Fulmar later became BOCM where Nick provided extensive technical support to customers. In 1999 Nick joined BioMar Scotland and in the years since has been involved in helping bring about advances in a range of key areas including flesh quality, nutrition, and raw materials, as well as the development of new species and quality schemes. In each case, Nick has always thrown himself into projects with enthusiasm, applying his in-depth technical knowledge of raw materials, feed and fish. This passion for the sector, huge personality and love of fish (from pellet to the plate) have, together, made an instrumental contribution to Scottish aquaculture over the years.  

The Global Salmon Initiative (GSI)

The Global Salmon Initiative (GSI) is a collection of fourteen international farmed salmon companies, representing over half of the salmon farming industry, who are united by the mission to improve the industry’s environmental and social performance, and improve consumer access to responsibly farmed salmon. The GSI has engaged a range of aquaculture stakeholders and companies in the initiative, including associate feed and pharmaceutical member companies. The GSI uses a model of pre-competitive collaboration to drive sustainable progress at the speed and scale needed to address the challenges facing our planet and populations today. Across four priority areas – certification, biosecurity, sourcing of sustainable feed and improving industry transparency – the GSI uses collaboration to drive sustainable improvements across the entire industry at a faster pace than if members worked independently. Before the GSI was formed, there was no collaboration like it in the seafood industry. Aligned to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 14), their CEO-led change model employs an approach guided by four key principles: collaboration, transparency, responsibility and innovation. The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has even written a business case about the successes of the GSI’s collaboration; ‘The Business Case for Pre-Competitive Collaboration: The Global Salmon Initiative (GSI).’ Outcomes Certification: All GSI members are committed to achieving 100% ASC certification. At the time of the GSI launch, no salmon farm in the world was ASC-certified, yet GSI’s members now have 65% (>700,000 tons) of their production certified. The ASC’s rigorous assessment ensures their members are held accountable and demonstrates the power of collaboration via third-party validation.

 

Mowi Scotland – River Lochy salmon enhancement project

Mowi is proud of a collaboration project with Lochaber District Salmon Fishery Board and the River Lochy Association that has been running and constantly evolving for the last ten years. The salmon enhancement project aims to blend the expertise within both the wild and farmed sectors to enhance and protect the local wild salmon populations in the rivers of Lochaber and beyond. The project has been watched closely by many stakeholders over the years and on both sides of the ongoing debate about salmon farming. It is seen as a very significant step towards ensuring a better future for salmon. The project itself, centred around Drimsallie Hatchery, involves rearing captive indigenous broodstock sourced from wild migrating smolts and then their progeny planted as eyed ova throughout under-utilised parts of their natal streams. Further recent developments to the project include the trialling of the release of captive reared indigenous broodstock, trapped as smolts, grown further at Mowi’s Loch Ailort aquaculture research centre and then ultimately reared to maturity and returned to Drimsallie to be released directly into spawning burns in the late autumn. The salmon are tagged allowing the team monitoring the project success at replenishing the wild juvenile population through their spawning naturally in the wild. This is pioneering work that has never been trialled before in Scotland.

 

Davidsons Animal Feeds / The James Hutton Institute – seaweed in livestock feeds

The Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) focuses on producing new seaweed-containing animal feeds. It is a ground-breaking project in collaboration between Davidsons Animal Feeds, an innovative supplier of bespoke animal feeds, and the James Hutton Institute, a world leader in transformational agricultural and environmental science. The KTP aims to utilise seaweeds to produce a novel range of ruminant livestock feeds with specific end benefits for Scotland and its animal production industries. They are nearing completion of their first scheduled three years in the project, and have already generated significant media interest on a national level. There is a strong track record for ruminants eating seaweeds in the wild and they believe they can reproduce the distinct nutritional benefits of seaweeds into healthy feed products with a unique selling proposition (USP), which will positively reflect the provenance of Scottish aquaculture. Livestock production is a vital component of the UK agriculture industry; however, it suffers from a large Carbon deficit, with a supply chain over-reliant on imported soybean as a protein source. Davidsons Animal Feeds & The James Hutton Institute work together to examine if native seaweeds can be substituted for soybean protein as well as investigating several other nutritional benefits.

Benchmark Genetics / Nofima – development of whitespot-resistant shrimp

Benchmark Genetics is an innovation-led, world-leader in breeding and genetics for vannamei shrimp, Atlantis salmon and tilapia, utilising modern breeding technologies such as QTL and genomic selection (GS). The results are improved disease resistance, faster growth and better yield which ensures cost-effective production and higher economic returns for the farmer. Benchmark Genetics goal is to be an industry recognised leader in innovation through breakthrough solutions and superior products. Benchmark Genetics has worked in close collaboration with Nofima, a world leading institute for applied research within the fields of fisheries, aquaculture and food research, to successfully produce a resistant line for White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Pacific white Shrimp (Litopenaues vannamei) through genomic selection (GS). The work was undertaken by a global team of Geneticists from Akvaforsk Genetics, who are all experts in the field. This pioneering work signifies the first application of GS in L. vannamei and represents a major milestone for advanced genetics work within the species. The collaborative project generated scientific knowledge on the successful implementation of genomic selection to improve WSSV resistance in marine shrimp. This innovative work has led to several new products and improved processes. Moreover, it has also triggered additional research and development work aimed at optimizing and adapting the genomic methodology for a wider array of key traits in L. vannamei. The WSSV resistance lines are ready to be shipped to the shrimp farmers worldwide aiming to reduce the high-risk of WSSV infection and outbreak.

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